USCIS Relaunches Customer Identity Verification (CIV)

Originally scheduled to go live in May 2013, the Customer Identity Verification (CIV) program begins implementation on Monday, September 9, 2013. CIV is a new USCIS tool, which verifies the identity of customers through the United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology’s (US-VISIT’s) Secondary Inspections Tool (SIT). Once identity verification is satisfactorily completed, individuals will proceed to their interviews or be issued their immigration documents.  As initially announced, InfoPass customers and those who are present only to accompany applicants will not be subject to CIV.

#immigrationupdates  

USCIS – USCIS Implements Customer Identity Verification at Field Offices
USCIS Implements Customer Identity Verification at Field Offices. Beginning September 9, 2013, USCIS will employ a new verification tool called Customer Identity Verification (CIV) in its domestic field offices. Customers will now submit biometric data, specifically fingerprints and photographs, …

Tagged with:

It's not a good idea

Here's a recent OSC guidance for employers regarding pre-population of Section 1 of the Form I-9 with previously obtained information from the employee.

Originally shared by +Loke Walsh Immigration Law

OSC Guidance on Pre-Population of Section 1 of the Form I-9

To avoid providing outdated or inaccurate information and depriving an employee with limited English proficiency (LEP) from understanding the accuracy of information on the form, the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices (OSC) discourages employers from pre-populating section 1 of the Form I-9 with previously obtained information from the employee.

"From the perspective of the anti-discrimination provision, OSC discourages the practice of an employer pre-populating Section 1 with previously obtained employee information. This practice increases the likelihood of including inaccurate or outdated information in Section 1 (for instance, from changes in legal name, address, or immigration or citizenship status). Outdated or inaccurate information in Section 1 may lead an employer to reject documents presented or demand specific documents for Section 2 purposes. This is particularly true if an employer does not provide an opportunity for the employee to review the information that was pre-populated and does not build in a method for making corrections. Further, if an employer uses the outdated or inaccurate information to submit an E-Verify query, a mismatch may result because the status or name in government databases conflicts with the employer's outdated information."

"Moreover, employers relying on previously gathered employee information may be more likely to overlook that a particular employee has limited English proficiency ("LEP") because Section 1 has been pre-populated by the employer. As a result, the employer may fail to provide that employee with translation or interpretation assistance in order to ensure the accuracy of Section 1 and in order to assist the employee in understanding the request for documents relating to Section 2."

#immigrationupdates #immigrationcompliance

www.justice.gov/crt/about/osc/pdf/publications/TAletters/FY2013/169.pdf

Tagged with: ,

Legal Permanent Residents in CA May Soon Be Allowed to Serve as Jurors

Interesting update for permanent residents living in California.

Originally shared by +Loke Walsh Immigration Law

Legal Permanent Residents in CA May Soon Be Allowed to Serve as Jurors

AB 1401 (http://goo.gl/3lgWEY), a bill that could make California the first state to allow "lawful permanent immigrants" to serve in the jury, clears the assembly floor (by a vote of 48-28), and heads to the Governor's desk for signature.

#immigrationupdates

California: Bill Would Allow Noncitizen Jurors
The legislation would make immigrants who are legal permanent residents eligible for jury duty.

Tagged with:

OSC Guidance on Pre-Population of Section 1 of the Form I-9

To avoid providing outdated or inaccurate information and depriving an employee with limited English proficiency (LEP) from understanding the accuracy of information on the form, the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices (OSC) discourages employers from pre-populating section 1 of the Form I-9 with previously obtained information from the employee.

"From the perspective of the anti-discrimination provision, OSC discourages the practice of an employer pre-populating Section 1 with previously obtained employee information. This practice increases the likelihood of including inaccurate or outdated information in Section 1 (for instance, from changes in legal name, address, or immigration or citizenship status). Outdated or inaccurate information in Section 1 may lead an employer to reject documents presented or demand specific documents for Section 2 purposes. This is particularly true if an employer does not provide an opportunity for the employee to review the information that was pre-populated and does not build in a method for making corrections. Further, if an employer uses the outdated or inaccurate information to submit an E-Verify query, a mismatch may result because the status or name in government databases conflicts with the employer's outdated information."

"Moreover, employers relying on previously gathered employee information may be more likely to overlook that a particular employee has limited English proficiency ("LEP") because Section 1 has been pre-populated by the employer. As a result, the employer may fail to provide that employee with translation or interpretation assistance in order to ensure the accuracy of Section 1 and in order to assist the employee in understanding the request for documents relating to Section 2."

#immigrationupdates   #immigrationcompliance  

Embedded Link

www.justice.gov/crt/about/osc/pdf/publications/TAletters/FY2013/169.pdf

Tagged with: ,

New resources to help protect immigrant crime victims

New resources to help protect immigrant crime victims.

 


 

USCIS Warns Stakeholders of Recent Telephone Scams

Please beware of telephone scammers.

Originally shared by +Loke Walsh Immigration Law

USCIS Warns Stakeholders of Recent Telephone Scams

USCIS does not initiate a phone call to applicants for personal and any form of payment information. So if you get an unexpected call like this, just say: NO THANK YOU!

Message:

Dear Stakeholder,

In recent weeks, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) learned of a new telephone scam targeting USCIS applicants and petitioners. Scammers are using a technique called “Caller ID spoofing” to display a misleading or inaccurate phone number in a recipient’s Caller ID. The scammer poses as a USCIS official and requests personal information (such as Social Security number, passport number, or A-number), identifies supposed issues in the recipient’s immigration records, and asks for payment to correct these records.

If you receive a call like that, USCIS urges you to say “No, thank you” and hang up immediately.

USCIS never asks for any form of payment or personal information over the phone. Do not give payment or personal information over the phone to anyone who claims to be a USCIS official. In general, we encourage you to protect your personal information and not to provide details about your immigration application in any public area.

If you have been a victim of this telephone scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission at https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/, or report it to an appropriate state authority. (Visit www.uscis.gov/avoidscams for information on where to report scams in your state.)

If you have a question about your immigration record, please call the National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283, or make an InfoPass appointment by visiting our website at http://infopass.uscis.gov.

Kind Regards,

Public Engagement Division
US Citizenship and Immigration Services

#immigrationupdates

FTC Bureau of Consumer Protection – Consumer Information
Before You Submit a Complaint. The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, collects complaints about companies, business practices, identity theft, and episodes of violence in the media. Why: Your complaints can help us detect patterns of wrong-doing, …

Tagged with:

USCIS Warns Stakeholders of Recent Telephone Scams

USCIS does not initiate a phone call to applicants for personal and any form of payment information. So if you get an unexpected call like this, just say: NO THANK YOU!

The Message:

Dear Stakeholder,

In recent weeks, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) learned of a new telephone scam targeting USCIS applicants and petitioners. Scammers are using a technique called “Caller ID spoofing” to display a misleading or inaccurate phone number in a recipient’s Caller ID. The scammer poses as a USCIS official and requests personal information (such as Social Security number, passport number, or A-number), identifies supposed issues in the recipient’s immigration records, and asks for payment to correct these records.

If you receive a call like that, USCIS urges you to say “No, thank you” and hang up immediately.

USCIS never asks for any form of payment or personal information over the phone. Do not give payment or personal information over the phone to anyone who claims to be a USCIS official. In general, we encourage you to protect your personal information and not to provide details about your immigration application in any public area.

If you have been a victim of this telephone scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission at https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/, or report it to an appropriate state authority. (Visit www.uscis.gov/avoidscams for information on where to report scams in your state.)

If you have a question about your immigration record, please call the National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283, or make an InfoPass appointment by visiting our website at http://infopass.uscis.gov.

Kind Regards,

Public Engagement Division
US Citizenship and Immigration Services

#immigrationupdates  

FTC Bureau of Consumer Protection – Consumer Information
Before You Submit a Complaint. The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, collects complaints about companies, business practices, identity theft, and episodes of violence in the media. Why: Your complaints can help us detect patterns of wrong-doing, …

Tagged with:

CBP travel tips for your next trip abroad

CBP travel tips for your next trip abroad

 


 

OSC Guidance

General contractors requiring subcontractor's employees to present original I-9 documentation could present a number of problems.

"If a general contractor were to ask an employee of a subcontractor to produce such documents a second time, this could present a number of problems. Given the passage of time that likely would have transpired from when an employee was initially hired by a subcontractor, such as your client, to when the general contractor is requesting to see the employee' s 1-9 documentation, the employee may no longer have the documents originally presented for a number of reasons not limited to but including: (1) the document(s) has expired and the employee now has a newer version of the originally presented document(s); (2) the employee has a different document due to adjustment of immigration status (i.e., from a lawful permanent resident to a U.S. citizen) and has forfeited his or her originally presented document; or (3) the document has been lost, stolen or misplaced. To the extent such individuals are barred from employment, they may perceive that the general contractor and/or subcontractor has discriminated against them based on their citizenship or immigration status. Because the proposed practice relates to the original 1-9 verification process, such employees might also allege discriminatory 1-9 practices in violation of the anti -discrimination provision. "

#immigrationupdates   #immigrationcompliance  

Embedded Link

ow.ly/nW9yB

Tagged with: ,

CBP Expands Global Entry Eligibility

Great news that CBP has expanded its Global Entry program to include frequent travelers from the UK, Germany, Qatar and Korea!

Originally shared by +Loke Walsh Immigration Law

CBP Expands Global Entry Eligibility

Global Entry is a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) program that allows expedited clearance for pre-approved, low-risk travelers upon arrival in the United States.

"Citizens participating in Korea’s Smart Entry System (SES), Germany’s Automated and Biometrics-Supported Border Controls (ABG) Plus, and select Qatar and United Kingdom citizens may be able to receive Global Entry benefits. While these arrangements have been previously announced, this notice serves to officially being implementation of the process.

Citizens of these countries must satisfy current program requirements, and will still need to fulfill application requirements, in order to qualify. Additionally, the Federal Register notice announces the ability for current U.S. Global Entry members to apply for membership in the Republic of Korea’s SES program, as well as the ability for a limited number to apply for Germany’s ABG Plus program."

More information about CBP's Global Entry program is available here: http://www.globalentry.gov/about.html.

#immigrationupdates #travelupdates

Global Entry Eligibility Officially Expanded to Citizens of Republic of Korea, Germany, Qatar, United Kingdom – CBP.gov
see also: right arrow, in National News Releases: CBP Releases Schedule for Completing its Modernized Trade Processing System in ACE · CBP Announces Partnerships for New and Expanded Services · U.S., China Announce Results of First Joint Intellectual Property Operation …

Tagged with: ,